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5 reasons why nodeJs is so popular

Node.js_logo

Node.js outshines other web applications by replacing websockets with revolutionary push technology. You would ask, what is so unique about it? Well, we finally have cutting-edge web applications with two-way, real-time connections where both the server and client can build communication, allowing them to exchange valuable data. Now this is in stark contrast to our conventional web response paradigm where only the client initiates communication

Node.js server technology is used to create and run a wide variety of web applications, and is quite similar to what Ruby On Rails, Spring Framework and ASP.NET does. It leverages JavaScript as the main language, which is a lightweight built-in web server and has a plethora of Plugins managed via the Node Package Manager (NPM), allowing you to custom-build your applications to meet your needs. It may sound like any other good web technology, but it has certain features that make it a popular choice among developers to build a wide spectrum of web applications.

Here are the top 5 reasons why nodeJs is so popular nowadays:

1. Node.js is superfast

Node.js is primarily a JavaScript runtime that is powered by V8, developed by Google for use in Chrome. V8 has the ability to compile and execute JavaScript at lightning fast speed, mainly because it compiles JavaScript into a native machine code. In addition to this, Node.js has a magical event loop, which is a single thread performing all I/O operations in an asynchronous manner. In Node.js, when an application has to perform I/O operation, it sends asynchronous tasks and callback action to the event loop, and then continues to perform the rest of the program. On completion of sync operation, the event loop automatically returns to the task to execute callback. This is much unlike traditional looping, which consumes a lot of memory and is exceptionally difficult to execute. Thus, reading/writing to file system, network connections, and to the database is executed very fast in Node. It allows developers to build fast and highly scalable network applications that are capable of handling bulk amounts of simultaneous connections having high throughput.

2. High Performance

PayPal uses Node.js, and has reported doubling the number of requests per-second and reducing the response time by 35%. On the other hand, Wal Mart, the retail giant had a superb experience with Node.js in 2013, when they put all their mobile-based traffic via Node.js on Black Friday, the busiest shopping time of the year. Amazingly, on Black Friday, Wal Mart servers did not go over a mere 1% CPU utilization and yet they deploy with 200,000,000 users online. LinkedIn, the global networking site, moved from Ruby to Node to handle their mobile traffic, and reduced the number of servers to 30 to 3, i.e. almost 90% reduction. The new system was up to 20 times faster. All these figures clearly indicate performance capability of Node.js.

3. JavaScript Everywhere

One of the biggest reasons why Node.js is so popular is because it uses JavaScript as its main language to build web applications. And to be honest, JavaScript is now the only choice to develop web applications in the browser. What more! A new and robust framework is introduced quite frequently to woo developers. With Node.js, JavaScript has literally revolutionized on the server. The language is common to most web developers, and is certainly driving the world today. And according to experts, the trend will not fade away soon.

Since JavaScript is a language that most developers know or have used at some point of time, the transition from another web technology to Node.js is a breeze. This makes it a preferred choice among web developers.

4. It is Lightweight

Typically, Node.js uses a basic event-driven architecture. This means everything executed on it, including every single operation and call, is a series of asynchronous callback. This enables Node to run on a single thread as unlike other web technologies where a new thread is spawned for every client request. This not only makes it light-in-weight, but also forms the foundation of Node’s non-blocking I/O feature.

5. It is Easy to Modify and Maintain

Traditionally built applications become less adaptive and rigid over time as new requirements are fed. Eventually, they start creaking under the stress they were not built for. However, developing new services using Node.js is comparatively easier. With Node, a bunch of small applications is built instead of a single, large application. This allows making changes or adding a new functionality with much ease, without having to make changes deep inside the code-base.

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This post is inspired from another blog written on this topic.

 


 

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5 good AngularJs framework you must know about

 

AngularJS is one of the most popular and open-source web application framework maintained by Google and a community of individual developers and corporations to address many of the challenges encountered in developing single-page applications.

If you are already familiar to AngularJS and want to turn on some real magic but don’t know the enough resources to spruce up the coding, don’t worry, some developers have adapted a few front-end frameworks to work and support AngularJS. These Frameworks come with some of useful tools and components that help developers to build innovative web applications quickly and easily.

 

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Below we have gathered 5 Best AngularJS Frameworks you can use for developing your web-applications without much hassle.

 

1. AngularUI Bootstrap

 

Angular UI Bootstrap is built on top of the front-end framework called Bootstrap. The framework contains a set of native AngularJS directives based on Bootstrap HTML and CSS components. Angular UI Bootstrap offers several directives, such as carousel, alert, date picker, dropdown, time picker, buttons and more.

 

2. Ionic

 

Ionic is a powerful front-end framework optimized for AngularJS for developing mobile applications. The framework uses AngularJS directives to support mobile components, tools and gestures made up of HTML5 and CSS3, thus offering rich user interfaces (UIs). Built with SAAS, Ionic offers a free and open-source software development kit (SDK) as well as a library of UI components for designing interactive, hybrid applications for touch devices.

 

3. Mobile Angular UI

 

Mobile Angular UI is a user interface (UI) framework for designing HTML5 mobile applications. It is optimized for AngularJS and Bootstrap and supports powerful libraries like fastclick.js and overthrow.js. The framework offers essential mobile components, such as sidebars, overlays, switches, scrollable areas and more. With Mobile Angular UI, you can design a responsive, mobile user-interface as well as convert desktop web applications to mobile applications.

 

4. LumX
 
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LumX is a fully-responsive front-end framework based on Google material design guidelines and optimized for AngularJS. LumX is built with SAAS, Neat and Bourbon providing customizable application design for smooth functionality and cool features.

 

5. Supersonic
 

Supersonic is a robust user interface framework (UI) for developing hybrid mobile applications. The framework integrates with any REST API (Application Programming Interface) and allows data interaction/modification in the backend. With Supersonic, one can design API-connected mobile applications for iOS and Android.

 

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The key differences between Python 2.x and Python 3.x with examples

Free-clip-art-thinkingMany novice Python users are wondering with which version of Python they should start. My answer to this question is usually something along the lines “just go with the version your favourite tutorial was written in, and check out the differences later on.”

But what if you are starting a new project and have the choice to pick? I would say there is currently no “right” or “wrong” as long as both Python 2.7.x and Python 3.x support the libraries that you are planning to use. However, it is worthwhile to have a look at the major differences between those two most popular versions of Python to avoid common pitfalls when writing the code for either one of them, or if you are planning to port your project. After looking at the differences if you are still not able to decide then this post might help.

What are the differences?

Python 3.0 was released in 2008. The final 2.x version 2.7 release came out in mid-2010, with a statement of extended support for this end-of-life release. The 2.x branch will see no new major releases after that. 3.x is under active development and has already seen over five years of stable releases, including version 3.3 in 2012, 3.4 in 2014, 3.5 in 2015, and 3.6 in 2016. This means that all recent standard library improvements, for example, are only available by default in Python 3.x.

Guido van Rossum (the original creator of the Python language) decided to clean up Python 2.x properly, with less regard for backwards compatibility than in the case for new releases in the 2.x range. The most drastic improvement is the better Unicode support (with all text strings being Unicode by default) as well as saner bytes/Unicode separation.

Besides, several aspects of the core language (such as print and exec being statements, integers using floor division) have been adjusted to be easier for newcomers to learn and to be more consistent with the rest of the language, and old cruft has been removed (for example, all classes are now new-style, “range()” returns a memory efficient iterable, not a list as in 2.x).

The What’s New in Python 3.0 document provides a good overview of the major language changes and likely sources of incompatibility with existing Python 2.x code. Nick Coghlan (one of the CPython core developers) has also created a relatively extensive FAQ regarding the transition.

However, the broader Python ecosystem has amassed a significant amount of quality software over the years. The downside of breaking backwards compatibility in 3.x is that some of that software (especially in-house software in companies) still doesn’t work on 3.x yet.

Some syntax differences :-

Division operator

If we are porting our code or executing the python 3.x code in python 2.x, it can be dangerous if integer division changes go unnoticed (since it doesn’t raise any error). It is preferred to use the floating value (like 7.0/5 or 7/5.0) to get the expected result when porting our code.

print 7 / 5
print -7 / 5   
 
'''
Output in Python 2.x
1
-2
Output in Python 3.x :
1.4
-1.4
 
'''

print function
This is the most well known change. In this the print function in Python 2.x is replaced by print() function in Python 3.x,i.e, to print in Python 3.x an extra pair of parenthesis is required.

print 'Hello, Geeks'      # Python 3.x doesn't support
print('Hope You like these facts')
 
'''
Output in Python 2.x :
Hello, Geeks
Hope You like these facts
 
Output in Python 3.x :
File "a.py", line 1
    print 'Hello, Geeks'
                       ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax
 
'''

As we can see, if we use parenthesis in python 2.x then there is no issue but if we don’t use parenthesis in python 3.x, we get SyntaxError.

Unicode
In Python 2, implicit str type is ASCII. But in Python 3.x implicit str type is Unicode.

print(type('default string '))
print(type(b'string with b '))
 
'''
Output in Python 2.x (Bytes is same as str)
<type 'str'>
<type 'str'>
 
Output in Python 3.x (Bytes and str are different)
<class 'str'>
<class 'bytes'>
'''

Python 2.x also supports Unicode

print(type('default string '))
print(type(u'string with b '))
 
'''
Output in Python 2.x (Unicode and str are different)
<type 'str'>
<type 'unicode'>
 
Output in Python 3.x (Unicode and str are same)
<class 'str'>
<class 'str'>
'''

xrange
xrange() of Python 2.x doesn’t exist in Python 3.x. In Python 2.x, range returns a list i.e. range(3) returns [0, 1, 2] while xrange returns a xrange object i. e., xrange(3) returns iterator object which work similar to Java iterator and generates number when needed.
If we need to iterate over the same sequence multiple times, we prefer range() as range provides a static list. xrange() reconstructs the sequence every time. xrange() doesn’t support slices and other list methods. The advantage of xrange() is, it saves memory when task is to iterate over a large range.

In Python 3.x, the range function now does what xrange does in Python 2.x, so to keep our code portable, we might want to stick to using range instead. So Python 3.x’s range function is xrange from Python 2.x.

for x in xrange(1, 5):
    print(x),
 
for x in range(1, 5):
    print(x),
 
'''
Output in Python 2.x
1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4
 
Output in Python 3.x
NameError: name 'xrange' is not defined
'''

Error Handling

try:
    trying_to_check_error
except NameError, err:
    print err, 'Error Caused'   # Would not work in Python 3.x
 
'''
Output in Python 2.x:
name 'trying_to_check_error' is not defined Error Caused
 
Output in Python 3.x :
File "a.py", line 3
    except NameError, err:
                    ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax
'''
try:
     trying_to_check_error
except NameError as err: # 'as' is needed in Python 3.x
     print (err, 'Error Caused')
 
'''
Output in Python 2.x:
(NameError("name 'trying_to_check_error' is not defined",), 'Error Caused')
 
Output in Python 3.x :
name 'trying_to_check_error' is not defined Error Caused
'''

_future_module
This is basically not a difference between two version, but useful thing to mention here. The idea of __future__ module is to help in migration. We can use Python 3.x
If we are planning Python 3.x support in our 2.x code,we can ise_future_ imports it in our code.

For example, in below Python 2.x code, we use Python 3.x’s integer division behavior using __future__ module

# In below python 2.x code, division works
# same as Python 3.x because we use  __future__
from __future__ import division
 
print 7 / 5
print -7 / 5
''' output
1.4
-1.4
'''

 
 

 

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Should I use Python 2 or Python 3 for my development activity?

thinker-28741_640Python is without any doubt one of the most talked about programming language in this Universe. It’s everywhere, and because of how simple it is to learn it – many beginners start their career with Python. The syntax of Python is very similar to that of English language, with the exception of a few extra characters here and there. Currently there are two main versions of Python, Python 2 and Python 3, that have slight differences in their syntax and their support of different libraries. You can refer this post to know the key differences between Python 2 and Python 3.

No doubt both versions of Python are good but many a times, beginners get confused while choosing one of the two for their development purpose. In this article I will try to explain which Python version can you use to start your development.

What are the differences?

Short version: Python 2.x is legacy, Python 3.x is the present and future of the language

In order to avoid making this post too long, I will be avoiding the details of differences between the two versions. The detailed post on differences between Python 2 and Python 3 can be found here.

Which version should I use?

Which version you ought to use is mostly dependent on what you want to accomplish.

If you can do exactly what you want with Python 3.x, great! There are a few minor downsides, such as very slightly bad library support and the fact that some current Linux distributions and Macs are still using 2.x as default (although Python 3 ships with many of them), but as a language Python 3.x is definitely ready. As long as Python 3.x is installed on your user’s computers (which ought to be easy, since many people reading this may only be developing something for themselves or an environment they control) and you’re writing things where you know none of the Python 2.x modules are needed, it is an excellent choice. Also, most Linux distributions have Python 3.x already installed, and available for end-users. Some are phasing out Python 2 as pre-installed default.

In particular, instructors introducing Python to new programmers should consider teaching Python 3 first and then introducing the differences in Python 2 afterwards (if necessary), since Python 3 eliminates many quirks that can unnecessarily trip up beginning programmers trying to learn Python 2.

However, there are some key issues that may require you to use Python 2 rather than Python 3.

  • Firstly, if you’re deploying to an environment you don’t control, that may impose a specific version, rather than allowing you a free selection from the available versions.
  • Secondly, if you want to use a specific third party package or utility that doesn’t have a released version that is compatible with Python 3, and porting that package is a non-trivial task, you may choose to use Python 2 in order to retain access to that package.

Python 3 already broadly supports creating GUI applications, with Tkinter in the standard library. Python 3 has been supported by PyQt almost from the day Python 3 was released; PySide added Python 3 support in 2011. GTK+ GUIs can be created with PyGObject which supports Python 3 and is the successor to PyGtk.
Many other major packages have been ported to Python 3 including:

  • NumPy and SciPy (for number crunching and scientific computing)
  • Django, Flask, CherryPy and Pyramid (for Web sites)
  • NumPy and SciPy (for number crunching and scientific computing)
  • Django, Flask, CherryPy and Pyramid (for Web sites)
  • And many, many more!

If you want to use Python 3.x, but you’re afraid to because of a dependency, it’s probably worthwhile doing some research first. This is a work in progress. Furthermore, with the large common subset supported by both Python 2.6+ and Python 3.3+, many modern Python code should run largely unmodified on Python 3, especially code written to interoperate with web and GUI frameworks that force applications to correctly distinguish binary data and text (some assistance from the six compatibility module may be needed to handle name changes).

Even though the official python documentation and the tutorial have been completely updated for Python 3, there is still a lot of documentation (including examples) on the Web and in reference books that use Python 2, although more are being updated all the time. This can require some adjustment to make things work with Python 3 instead.

Some people just don’t want to use Python 3.x, which is their prerogative. However, they are in the minority.
It is worth noting that if you wish to use an alternative implementation of Python such as IronPython, Jython or Pyston (or one of the longer list of Python platform or compiler implementations), Python 3 support is still relatively rare. This may affect you if you are interested in choosing such an implementation for reasons of integration with other systems or for performance.

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Top 7 Websites and Apps built with AngularJs

AngularJS is a popular framework for building web applications. When I created my first AngularJS app, I got advice from a colleague at work who had experience on how to set everything up. That helped me tremendously because I didn’t have to guess at best practices.  AngularJS provides a great platform to build your website.Today we will look upon top 7 websites built with AngularJS to let you know more about this technology.

1. freelancer.com

 

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Freelancer is the world’s most renowned marketplace for outsourcing. The employer just needs to post the project to get their work done. There are around 15.7 million freelancers registered on this site who compete against each other by bidding on the project.

2. paypal.com

 

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Paypal is one of the worldwide leading Internet payment companies. It’s another example of large websites using AngularJS.

3. angularjs.org

 

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Angularjs.org is a website for learning AngularJS. This site contains videos, free course, tutorials, case studies, documentations and API references to learn AngularJS. This site gives a perfect platform for learning AngularJS to novice.

4. istockphoto.com

 

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Istockphoto has a huge collection of images, videos and photo clips. These images can be purchased at a nominal price of US $0.95 to $1.50 with price range varying on the credits allotted to an image.

5. upwork.com

 

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UpWork is another great website which provides a platform where employer can find freelancers for any job at any time. It allows client to work, hire and interview with freelancers thereby, reducing the efforts to find a suitable employee for the role.

6. localytics.com

 

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Localytics is a marketing platform for mobile and web app owners to build a strong customer relationship through their analytics. This service offering platform is used by 6,000 companies, like Microsoft, eBay, ESPN, and others. Localytics developers were previously using Backbone before they decided to move to AngularJS framework. And now their integrated approach to app helps users to deliver a more personalized experience. They believed AngularJS helped to solve common UI related problems and reduce the amount of code comparing to the previous framework.

7. netflix.com

 

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Netflix is headquartered at California (United States) and provides on request internet streaming media to viewers. It brings the latest movies and TV series at your doorstep by sending you DVDs via Permit Reply Mail.